Posts Tagged ‘Innoweave’

Leading Large-Scale Change for Ontario Youth: Innoweave’s Youth CI Program

Mary Rose blog photo enIn December, the Foundation’s Innoweave initiative launched Youth CI, an exciting new partnership with the Laidlaw Foundation and Government of Ontario. Youth CI builds on Innoweave’s Collective Impact module to help communities across Ontario learn about, develop, launch, and implement Collective Impact initiatives that directly improve outcomes for youth.

Across the community sector there is a growing recognition that large-scale change can’t be achieved by organizations working in isolation. Youth CI provides organizations facing complex challenges (like youth homelessness) the space and the resources needed to develop a collaborative plan using the Collective Impact framework.Youth CI

 

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Experiencing the shock of the possible in uncertain times…

Note: This article is cross-posted from the MaRS Discovery District and Social Innovation Generation (SiG), with permission from the authors. 

Guest post by Social Innovation Generation’s Tim Draimin, Executive Director and Kelsey Spitz, Communications and Research Associate.

Indeed these are uncertain times that we live in… ~Stephen Huddart

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 10.15.42 AMSpeaking to an over-200-person audience at MaRS Discovery District on November 24, Stephen Huddart, President and CEO of the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, challenged the growing contemporary narrative that our future is bleak and looming ahead with daunting uncertainty.

Reminding us of a long history of Canadian precedents for testing systems-level innovation, and of the new big experiments underway today, Stephen invited us to experience the shock of the possible (a term coined by Eric Young).

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The Dance of Deception

Beth-2014-1
“Each side is playing a role – the ultra-lean NGO that somehow is changing the world on pennies, and the benevolent philanthropist who always bets on the right horse.”

~Laurie Michaels (individual philanthropist, board chair Aspen Institute)

Horse Race. Photo by Sheree Zielke, 2007. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Horse Race. Photo by Sheree Zielke, 2007. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 / https://flic.kr/p/AbUi2

At the Canadian Environmental Grantmakers’ Network annual conference this past spring, I facilitated a session with Devika Shah of the Pembina Institute which was provocatively titled Interrupting the Dance of Deception. The panel was made up of two funders and two ‘fundees’, and their reflections kicked off an animated discussion, which has stayed with me many weeks later.

The term dance of deception was coined by former McConnell Foundation CEO Tim Brodhead, referring to a dynamic that occurs when groups pretend they can solve a huge problem, and funders pretend to believe them. As Tim has explained, this deception is not intentional or malicious in any way. Rather, it refers to a tendency among organizations and funders to jointly develop funding agreements and relationships without fully acknowledging that the best laid plans are often derailed by power and politics. Recognizing that as funders we do sometimes ‘bet on the wrong horses’, and that grantees often operate in a complex and unpredictable landscape, a reflection on the session seemed an apt way to begin this blog.

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Reflections on the 2014 Evaluation Roundtable

Stephen-Huddart-authorLast week, the Foundation co-hosted [1] the Evaluation Roundtable in Montreal. This Washington DC-based network of some 30 US and Canadian foundations meets every 18 months to study a case in philanthropic strategy and evaluation, and this time the subject was Social Innovation Generation (SiG), the Foundation’s seven-year partnership with the University of Waterloo, MaRS Discovery District and Plan Institute. Its purpose is to foster a culture of continuous social innovation in Canada.

By many measures, SiG is a success.  Through a happy convergence of intent and circumstance the term social innovation is in wider use, and the partners, along with SiG’s national office, have contributed individually and collectively to Canada’s ability to address complex and persistent systemic challenges. Examples include SiG’s role in introducing impact investing and social labs; the first Ministry of Social Innovation, in BC; teaching and research into the nature of systemic change; the introduction of new philanthropic platforms such as Innoweave; and many more.

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